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vegan mythbusting: ethics

Welcome to a new, soon-to-be-regular blog feature: vegan mythbusting!

People ask me all kinds of stuff about vegan life. People probably also assume all kinds of things about it (like that I went vegan because my reaction to seeing a piglet was similar to the drawing below. I probably would fawn over a cute piglet – who wouldn’t?! – but this goes deeper than a squee!) Sometimes those things are evident, and probably a lot of them aren’t. Why not talk about it?

People find out I’m vegan and probably think it’s because I once saw a piglet and did this

Before we go on, let’s be clear: the point of vegan mythbusting isn’t to get all the backup I have and tell the world that what they think is wrong. That doesn’t help anyone. The goal here is to create a clearer understanding of what really lies behind our plates of veggie bacon. I can only speak for myself, so start a conversation if you know someone else who’s veg and are interested in what their motivations are.

Today’s Vegan Myth: Your ethics concern animals alone and/or prioritize non-humans over humans. You must be ignorant and/or insensitive.

This is a common one. It often gets presented to me in the form of “there are so many other problems in the world, why aren’t you trying to help people instead?”

(What a cop-out question. Who says you can’t do both? And who says that being vegan only helps animals? If I started eating animals again, would it help any marginalized group in their struggle? I’ll elaborate on this in a bit.)

When it comes to the question of what motivates vegans, there’s more to it than meets the eye.

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having a field day

Hello blog-readers,

suddenly it’s July and I find myself so busy with farm work that I haven’t written anything about it until now!

I started a job at a new farm this spring in a supervisory role, which is exciting. Things have been going well and I’m learning a lot, as I expected to. We grow many of the vegetable crops I’m already familiar with, and some that are new to me, but the farm is run quite differently than any I’ve been at before. I always find it interesting to see how each farm does things, and this has definitely been a good learning experience so far. Brushing up on efficiency and becoming familiar with the small details are important parts of my position there, and I expect it to take the whole season before I really know it well, but things are going smoothly and I’m enjoying it of course.

Organic salad greens are relatively lucrative (and delicious). We grow many.GH

Most of my days are spent with the non-salad veggies, like this bok choi, in the field.choi

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